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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
in egypt as protesters attacked president mohamed morsi's house. and others demonstrate in tahrir square. a live report on the protests right after this. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] can't find theraflu? try alka-seltzer plus for fast, liquid, cold, and flu relief. [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need? open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. so don't wait. now's the time to get on a path that could be right for you... with unitedhealthcare medicare solutions. call today to learn about the kinds of cover
as opponents of mohammed morsi fight each other. it started and both sides started throwing rocks and sticks. this morning, the situation is reportedly quiet. but political term oil is expected to continue with the government saying the constitutional. >> president obama spoke on the phone last night with the speaker of the house. neither the white house nor the office of john boehner is talking about that conversation. and officials say there's no immediate plan. tax hikes and deep spending cuts are set to kick in on the 1st of january. with 26 days left, the white house is telling federal agencies and the pentagon to get ready for massive cuts if they can't find an agreement. >> other big story this morning, a gun is found inside a student's locker in a fairfax county school. >> school officials say there was never any danger to the students or staff. melanie is live this morning with more. >> reporter: well, tony, students are settling in to their classes and continuing to monitor the situation to ensure the safety of staff and students. still neither they nor police have publically said
of protesters attack the egyptian president mohammed morsi's home throwing rocks and glass and bottles. according to reports, they've pushed down these barriers to actually protect his home. >>> plus, it is never been done before. this is a journey across the antarctic on foot and in the winter, but this great adventurer finally being attempted. we're going to hear from sir randolph fines about how he could be the first man to ever cross the south pole. >> it's like a drug. it's like an addiction. once you are bitten by polar records, you keep going for it. in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. when we got married. i had three kids. and she became the full time mother of three. it was soccer, and ballet, and cheerleading, and baseball. those years were crazy. so, as we go into this next phase, you know, a big part of it for us is that there isn't anything on the schedule. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all
of the egypt presidential palace and sprayed graffiti. demonstrators threw rocks at the home of mohamed morsi, furious over his decree expanding his powers, putting it beyond judicial review. the opposition is demanding he postpone a december 15 referendum on a draft constitution. critics fear the charter would help the islamist dominated government consolidate its power. >>> an a powerful earthquake struck on japan's northeast coast today. 7.3 magnitude quake shook buildings in tokyo. looking at video there. it triggered a three foot tsunami wave. japan is still recovering from a massive earthquake you remember and tsunami that killed more than 15,000 people last year. >>> wow. the owner of this jewelry store in georgia says it's a miracle no one was killed when this happened. a driver accidentally rammed her minivan into the store. she told police a cannister lodged against the gas pedal. flying glass hit customers, one woman had a deep cut in the back of her head. the store had $30,000 in damage, but thank goodness no one was seriously, seriously injured or killed. look at that, wolf. wow.
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
is here. she's picking up that part of the story. >> embattled president mohammed morsi went on nationwide tv. he addressed the protests. he seemed to inflamed their outrage. within minutes, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in cairo was up in flames. reza joins us on the phone from cairo. we want to talk about president morsi in a second. first, you just arrived at the scene of the fire at the muslim brotherhood headquarters. what are you seeing, and what are you learning about who's responsible for this? >> reporter: let's verify what happened. two hours ago, they reported the main headquarters here in cairo was attacked by protesters and torched. we raced over here. we're in front of the headquarters right now. there's no indication of a fire here, but certainly there's a large group of what appear to be opponents of president morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they're trying to do everything they can to get to this building, and they're being blocked by police. so we have yet another standoff. if anyone thought president morsi's speech would pacify these people and calm them down, thi
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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